Major & Minor Requirements

Major in Computational Media
Requirements

The major includes 14 courses – 7 from Computer Science and 7 from Visual and Media Studies.

On the Computer Science side, students must take 4 core courses from COMPSCI 201, 230 or 330, 210 or 250, and a course on computer systems or 370 (Artificial Intelligence) or 371 (Machine Learning). In addition, 3 electives, which may consist of any Computer Science course at the 200 level or above, with at most two Research Independent Studies. Two of those courses must be 300-level or above. Prerequisites include COMPSCI 101/102/116, MATH 111, MATH 112, or 100-level STA or higher.

On the Visual and Media Studies side, requirements include VMS 202D: Introduction to Visual Culture; one Theories course, 327S: Theories of Visual Studies or LIT 328S: Media Theory, or an approved alternative; two AAHVS practice-based courses or approved alternatives at the 200-level or above; 3 additional 200+ VMS electives, including approved cross-lists; and one approved Technical Project Experience. All majors are also required to submit a Major Portfolio documenting their work.

Minor in Computational Media

Requirements

The minor includes two VMS/CMAC practice courses; two VMS/CMAC thematic courses, and one COMPSCI course at the 200-level or above.

Course Selection Details

Thematic Courses

Courses that count towards the "thematic" requirements are primarily focused on topics like history, criticism, theory, and culture. They may include paper assignments that have a project dimension. Examples include Media History: Old and New; Media, Memory and Archive; and various courses in AAHVS and other departments focused on digital culture and various other topics, for example Digital Feminisms (GSF), The Selfie (LIT), or Games and Culture (AMES). Note that study of computational media and cultures happens in various places on campus. Many, but not all, courses that will fulfill this requirement will be cross-listed with CMAC or ISS (over time we hope to make more of these links formal as we discover them), so you should discuss which courses might "count" with your advisor, even if they aren't currently cross-listed. It does not matter which header you register with, but it makes it easier to track students if you use CMAC to sign up, when it is available.

Practice Courses

Courses that count towards the "practice" requirements are primarily focused on hands-on making of digital or computational media assignments and projects. They may also include some background readings, but the focus is clearly on developing competency with specific tools and methods. Examples include courses like Web-Based Multimedia, Web Project Design and Development, Physical Computing, Data Visualization, Digital Storytelling, Digital Imaging, Virtual Museums, and Immersive Virtual Worlds.  Most of these courses have or will have a CMAC or ISS designation. Some courses in CINE, STATS, and elsewhere may also apply. It does not matter which header you register with, but it makes it easier to track students if you use CMAC to sign up, when it is available.

Hybrid Theory-Practice Courses

Hybrid theory-practice courses usually revolve around a specific project and include research elements as well as hands-on production. Project-based courses offered through the CMAC and Digital Art History and Visual Culture Research Labs often fit into this category, as well as the Proseminars for the MA in Digital Art History/Computational Media. Usually this sort of course can be counted as either practice or thematic. Discuss your plans with your advisor. It does not matter which header you register with, but it makes it easier to track students if you use CMAC to sign up, when it is available.

Remember that 4 out of 7 courses in the VMS side of your Computational Media interdepartmental major must originate in AAHVS. To determine if a course originates in AAHVS, your first step is to look at the AAHVS faculty page to see if the course's instructor is listed there. If in doubt, ask your advisor.

Computer Science Courses

For questions about Computer Science courses in the IDM and minor, you should consult the Computer Science department directly.

Project Requirement (Major)

The project requirement may be fulfilled in numerous ways, including though Bass Connections, Data+, Story+, Code+ and various lab-based projects. You will be expected to write a project report documenting the project and your role its creation in order to receive credit towards the degree requirements.

Distinction (Major)

Students wishing to pursue Distinction in the Computational Media IDM follow the same requirements as those in Visual and Media Studies for registration. The Distinction project itself must include both practice-based and written components.

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